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How to Write a Descriptive Essay

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❶Do you have any suggestions for writing a sentence in a pleasant way? Broad irregular bands of light from the Milky Way stretched across the sky while the big and little dipper shined brightly.

Step 2: Create a statement

Step 1: Choose a topic
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If you are writing about a person or a place you need to order the paragraphs so that you start off in a general manner and then write more specific details later.

Your introductory paragraph sets the tone for the rest of the essay, so it needs to set out all of the main ideas that you are going to cover in your essay. The next step is to create a thesis statement. This is a single idea that will be prominent throughout your essay.

It not only sets out the purpose of the essay, but regulates the way that the information is conveyed in the writing of that essay. This is an introductory paragraph that sets out your topic framework. Next, create five labelled columns on a sheet of paper, each one having a different of the five senses. This labelled list will help you to sort out your thoughts as you describe your topic — the taste, sight, touch, smell and sound of your topic can be sketched out among the columns.

List out in the columns any sensation or feeling that you associate with the topic that you are writing about. You need to provide full sensory details that help to support the thesis. You can utilize literary tools such as metaphors, similes, personification and descriptive adjectives.

Once you have the columns laid out you can start to fill them with details that help to support your thesis. These should be the most interesting items that you have noted in your columns and will the details that you flesh out into the paragraphs of the body of your essay.

Topics are set out in each separate paragraph and a topic sentence begins that paragraph and need to relate to your introductory paragraph and your thesis.

The next step is to create an outline listing the details of the discussion of each paragraph. Students in high school are generally asked to write a five paragraph essay while college students are given more freedom with the length of their piece.

Part 1 Quiz True or False: Essays have to be about real things, events, or people. Outline the essay in sections. Organize the essay by creating a brief outline. Do this in sections: The standard is to have a five paragraph essay, one paragraph for introduction, three paragraphs for body, and one for conclusion.

But you can also try having sections instead, allowing you to have as many paragraphs as you want for the body section of the essay. Create a thesis statement. A thesis statement is the key idea or theme for the essay. It states the purpose of the essay and acts as a guide for the rest of the essay. The thesis statement should appear in your introduction and be restated in your conclusion. Write a strong introduction. The introduction to the descriptive essay should set the scene and introduce the reader to the subject.

Use the list of sensory details to describe the subject. Then, end the introduction with your thesis statement. She is a fierce protector and a mysterious woman to my sisters and I.

Describe the topic with vivid adjectives. Use adjectives that express emotion. Be as specific as you can. Use metaphors and similes. Metaphors are when you compare one thing to another.

Use metaphors to show the reader what you think about the topic, rather than simply tell the reader how you feel.

Discuss your emotions and thoughts about the topic. Do not be afraid to express your emotions in your essay. Do you feel joy, sadness, angry, or disgust with the subject? How do you respond emotionally to the subject? Wrap up the essay with a strong conclusion.

Your conclusion should tie all the thoughts in your essay together. Restate your thesis statement in the conclusion and end with a strong final sentence. Do not add anything new to your essay in the conclusion. Simply evaluate your thoughts in the essay and wrap things up with a short, final statement.

Part 2 Quiz Which of the following is a metaphor? My mom sacrificed a lot for us. My mother is like a fierce warrior in battle. My mother is a workhorse. Read the essay out loud. Once you have completed a draft of the essay, read it aloud to yourself. Listen for any awkward or unclear sentences.

Circle these sentences so you can revise them later. Ask them to let you know if there are any unclear or vague sentences in the essay. Show the essay to others. Show the draft to peers, teachers, family members, and mentors. Ask them if they think the essay is descriptive and full of sensory detail. Have them tell you if they got a clear picture of the subject by the end of the essay. This will only make your essay stronger. Revise the essay for clarity and length.

Go through the essay and remove any sentences that do not feel necessary to the paper. Replace any weak adjectives with strong adjectives. Make sure your descriptions of the subject are clear and easy to follow. Add more detail to the paper or take unnecessary content out to reach the word count.

Part 3 Quiz Why is it important to accept constructive criticism? Because constructive criticism will help you create a clearer picture of your subject Exactly! The scoops were just starting to melt tiny rivers of melted cream down the sides of the hot brownie, pooling on the bottom of the pure white bowl. These scoops of ice cream were draped with a sumptuous, rich, hot fudge sauce. Topping the luscious sauce was an ample dollop of whipped cream that was in perfect contrast to the dense, almost too rich dessert below.

The whipped cream was topped with a shower of chocolate sprinkles and finely chopped walnuts. What finally completed this wonderful creation was a perfect maraschino cherry, its red juice sending tiny streams down the whole mountain of dessert delight. The contrast of colors, textures and flavors in this dessert appealed to every part of my senses. I could not wait to eat it.

My eight year old son, Joshua, stands out in a crowd of children because of his distinctive appearance and gentle manner. The first thing I notice when I look at him is his size.

He stands at shoulder height next to me; indeed, he is a head taller than other children his age, and is definitely stronger. His weight is a hefty pounds; without a doubt, he weighs forty pounds more than other children in his grade level. Recently, my husband signed him up for flag football, where he was told: His eyes are pale blue, and his eyebrows blond; in fact, white, in contrast with his red hair. His lips are full and somewhat feminine, and his newly-grown permanent teeth, which appear large alongside his remaining baby teeth, have a wide gap.

His shoulders are broad, his chest juts out, and his belly is plump. His forearms are bulky, and will someday be powerful, yet his wrists retain the same creases he has had since he was a ten pound newborn. When we hold hands, his hands feel nearly as large as mine, and are unexpectedly soft.

His legs are sturdy and strong, and his knees are covered with fresh scrapes and purple bruises, received while skateboarding and biking. His feet are size 6 and wide; therefore, too wide for slip-on tennis shoes. Despite his appearance, Joshua is unexpectedly sensitive and caring; in fact, he still likes to sit on my lap, an awkward feat for me. He likes to open doors for me, tend his little brother, and help me grocery shop.

From head to toe he is a contradiction; although he is only eight years old, he is big and strong, while loving and gentle, and that makes him stand out from other children, at least in my eyes. At the entrance of the ruins, large palm frond trees stand lush and tall with wild life resting on its branches. In the middle of this miniature rain forest is a dirt path leading towards a hand built stone wall ten feet tall. While walking through the passage built in the wall, on the right, at the top of the wall sat a large, brown and green hued iguana.

Just past this great wall of protection is a field of green grass overlooking the ruin's. To the left is a small court yard bordered by a stone wall leading to the agua blue, warm ocean a few hundred yards away. In a corner section of this cramped courtyard, is a fresh water hole in a cave like crevice. As you walk the acres upon acres of grass, the sounds of chirping and squawking birds permeate the air.

Vibrant colored plants and iguanas of all sizes give you an idea of life as it was two thousand years ago. Enormous square and rectangular stones capture the eye for the beauty they hold both outside and the history made inside.

Steep staircases rise from the ground to ascend to the top of these world treasures; in fact, a few of these temples were built atop the cliffs of the Yucatan Peninsula. The beach below is blinding white, soft coral sand, crushed to a fine powder by swift ocean currents. A beach in Hawaii on a December day is like a day at a lake in mid August.

The beach smells fresh, almost like a new ocean breeze air freshener. The sand is hot and looks like gold blended in with little white specks; it sparkles like the water running off the swimmers back and feels like walking on coals from a burning grill.

Not far from the shore, you can see the coral sitting still in the wild and shallow water. Trutles drift in to see all the people. The plam trees sway in the air from the forceful wind. In a distance, a house is beutifully placed right by the water, so it can look across the ocean each and every day. People are laughing and playing in the burning sand, and others are relaxing on the beach bronzing their skin while enjoying the bright rays of light coming from the sun.

From a far distance the ocean is a deep navy blue; waves come in like a bulldozer from all the wind. At night everything is still. Waves are still coming in but not as hard, while the beach is cleared from all the people. All you can hear is the waves of the ocean and the light breeze coming from the giant palm trees. The beach is a spectacular place. Leaving it is excruciating and difficult to do. The old car slowly chugged down the street like the caboose of a steam engine train.

The car goes up the hill it goes Ka boom , kachunk. The car is old and weathered with rust covering the entire body like cancer consuming its victim. Wheels and tires wobble like a drunk bum on his way home from the bar. Hub caps are gone along with all the mirrors and extras on the car.


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Jun 04,  · You may need to write a descriptive essay for a class assignment or decide to write one as a fun writing challenge. Start by brainstorming ideas for the essay. Then, outline and write the essay using sensory detail and strong description%().

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A good descriptive paragraph is like a window into another world. Through the use of careful examples or details, an author can conjure a scene that vividly describes a person, place, or thing. The best descriptive writing appeals to all five senses―smell, sight, taste, touch, and hearing―and is found in both fiction and nonfiction.

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Descriptive Piece of Writing: The Park Wandering through the park, engulfed by my thick coat, I stare around me with disgust. The once green and beautiful park is now grey and boring; damaged by youths. Descriptive writing-War piece The boat sped almost noiselessly towards the shore. I stood at the helm anxiously scanning the beach for any sign that we had been spotted. But the shore lay calm and silent bathed in the orange afterglow of the setting sun.

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These are just a few stories I've written in my English/Creative Writing classes during high school. Some of them include some sensitive topics and can be fairly descriptive, so make sure you're comfortable with that sort of thing before reading. Jun 19,  · Excerpts of brilliant descriptive writing. Anything by Angela Carter is usually very beautiful - but as an interesting piece of literature there is Jon Mcgregors If No One Speaks of Remarkable Things, which is an entirely descriptive novel. darkhaloangel, Jun 16, #6.